Review: I Now Pronounce You Someone Else

I Now Pronounce You Someone Else
by Erin McCahan
Pub. June 2010
Arthur Levine Books
Contemporary YA

Here Comes the Bride — If She Can Pass Chemistry.Eighteen-year-old Bronwen Oliver has a secret: She’s really Phoebe, the lost daughter of the loving Lilywhite family. That’s the only way to explain her image-obsessed mother; a kind but distant stepfather; and a brother with a small personality complex. Bronwen knows she must have been switched at birth, and she can’t wait to get away from her “family” for good.Then she meets Jared Sondervan. He’s sweet, funny, everything she wants — and he has the family Bronwen has always wanted too. She falls head over heels in love, and when heproposes marriage, she joyfully accepts. But is Jared truly what she needs? And if he’s not, she has to ask: What would Phoebe Lilywhite do

Photo and summary from Goodreads.com

For some reason recently I keep being surprised by how much I like a lot of the books I’ve been selecting.  This, wonderfully, was one of them!  This was an enjoyable read that got me thinking about my family and who I am because of them.

1.  Continuing with what I was just talking about, this book is all about originally not accepting where you come from and wanting to run as far as you possibly can from that.  It’s so much easier to think “everything would be so perfect if I were born into that family” and I feel like this book depicts those yearnings while showing the true reality of the story.

2.  I love love love love love love the beginning pacing of the relationship between Bronwnen and the boy.  The initial pacing is what stands out the most to me and one of the reasons this book has stuck in my head.

3.  The ending kind of speeds up a lot, but it’s nice because it ties up all of the loose endings.  You aren’t left wondering what’s going to happen and how someone feels about a certain situation when you close this book.

4.  One of Bronwen’s “problems” is she tends to be a people pleaser.  She’ll end up doing something she doesn’t like just so she just doesn’t have to go out of her way to say no (for the most part!  There are definitely some things she sticks up for herself with!).  As someone who is completely and utterly non-confrontational it was really cool to see a character struggle with some of the same things I struggle with.  It was also pretty interesting to see her mental process behind her decisions to speak up and not to speak up.

5.  The boy in this story definitely has his own set of flaws.  Although this got me really frustrated with him at times, it really humanized him.  Actually, Erin McCahan did a really good job at rounding out all the characters.  I’m pretty sure I got upset with every single character, but I definitely didn’t end up hating anyone– they all had their positives with the negatives!

Ultimate Review: I feel like this is a really good “role model” book to help younger people make good decisions without being too preachy.  If you’re looking for a breath of fresh air in the contemporary YA genre, you’ll get one flipping through these pages!
This was…: My Valentines Day book!  I read it ’cause it is pink.  I figured on Valentines Day you should only be allowed to read pink books.  I might have to start color coordinating book cover colors to holidays…

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3 thoughts on “Review: I Now Pronounce You Someone Else

  1. Oooh Bronwen, now there’s a good old Welsh name for you… this book looks quite good fun. I’ll keep an eye out for it. Do you know if it’s publishing in the UK?

    • You know, I’m not sure. I tried to find the answer for that, but I couldn’t find anything about where the book is released besides the US. I submitted a question about that though on her website on her question form, so as soon as I hear back from her site I’ll let you know what I learn. Oh, I do know you can get it through amazon.uk– I’m not sure if that means anything for you though!

  2. Pingback: Review: We’ll Always Have Summer (book #3) « Jenny Likes Books

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